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Reaction Engineering (Chemical and Biochemical Processes)

1. COURSE INFORMATION:

SchoolEnvironmental Engineering
Course LevelUndergraduate
Course IDENVE 317Semester5th
Course CategoryRequired
Course ModulesInstruction Hours per WeekECTS
Lectures and Laboratory assignments5
Th=3, E=1, L=4/4
5
Course TypeScientific Area
Prerequisites 
Instruction/Exam LanguageGreek
The course is offered to Erasmus studentsYes
Course URLhttps//www.eclass.tuc.gr/courses/MHPER172/    (in Greek)

 

2. LEARNING OUTCOMES

Learning Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this course the students will acquire new knowledge and specific skills on the following subjects:

  1. Will have knowledge of the stoichiometry and kinetics of chemical reactions.
  2. Will be able to understand the Arrhenius equation.
  3. Will learn the methods and techniques for the design of isothermal homogeneous reactors (batch, CSTR, PFR).
  4. Will gain knowledge of the operation of CSTR reactors in series and PFR reactors with recycling.
  5. Can analyze kinetic data from reactors.
  6. Will gain knowledge of catalysis and chemical catalysts.
  7. Will be able to understand the operation of biochemical reactions with free enzymes and Michaelis-Menten kinetics.
  8. Can determine kinetic parameters.
  9. Will have knowledge of. Inhibition of enzymatic reactions.
  10. Can analyze mathematical models for microorganisms growth (one variable, limiting substrate, maintenance and endogenous metabolism).
  11. Will be able to design bioreactors (batch, fed-batch, CSTR).
 
General Competencies/Skills
 
  • Review, analyze and synthesize data and information, with the use of necessary technologies
  • Project design and management
 

3. COURSE SYLLABUS

 
  1. Stoichiometry and kinetics of chemical reactions.
  2. The Arrhenius equation.
  3. Design of isothermal homogeneous reactors (batch, CSTR, PFR).
  4. CSTR reactors in series and Recycle PFR reactors.
  5. Analysis of kinetic data from reactors.
  6. Catalysis and chemical catalysts.
  7. Reactions with free enzymes and Michaelis-Menten kinetics.
  8. Determination of kinetic parameters.
  9. Inhibition of enzymatic reactions.
  10. Mathematical models for microorganisms growth (one variable, limiting substrate, maintenance and endogenous metabolism).
  11. Design of bioreactors (batch, fed-batch, CSTR).
  12. Sterilization kinetics. Aeration and agitation of bioreactors.
  13.  Determination the optimal operating conditions. Applications.
 

4. INSTRUCTION and LEARNING METHODS - ASSESSMENT

Lecture MethodDirect (face to face)

Use of Information and Communication Technology

 
  • Power point presentations
  • E-class support
 
Instruction OrganisationActivityWorkload per Semester
(hours)
- Lectures39
- Tutorials13
- Lab assignments13
- Projects10
- Autonomous study50
Course Total125

Assessment Method

Ι. Written final examination (75%): Theoretical problems to be resolved.

II. Laboratory exercises (25%).

III. Group and autonomous assignments (Bonus 10%).

5. RECOMMENDED READING

 
  • O. Levenspiel, ‘Chemical Reaction Engineering’, 3rd Edition, Wiley (Εκδ. Κωσταράκη)
  • H.S. Fogler, ‘Elements of Chemical Reaction Engineering’, 3rd Edition, Prentice Hall
  • «Biochemical Engineering», H.W. Blanch & D.S. Clark, Marcel-Dekker (1996)
 

6. INSTRUCTORS

Course Instructor:Professor N. Kalogerakis (Faculty - EnvEng) Assistant Professor P. Panagiotopoulou (Faculty - EnvEng)
Lectures:Professor N. Kalogerakis (Faculty - EnvEng) Assistant Professor P. Panagiotopoulou (Faculty - EnvEng)
Tutorial exercises:Professor N. Kalogerakis (Faculty - EnvEng) Assistant Professor P. Panagiotopoulou (Faculty - EnvEng)
Laboratory Exercises:A. Pantidou (SLTS - EnvEng), R. Sarika (LTS - EnvEng)